Recipe: Lemon Breakfast Cookies, Gluten-Free, Sourdough (Fast and Easy Recipe, using leftover starter)

 

The one thing that may discourage some people from baking with sourdough is the prep time; dough has to be mixed and requires several hours to ferment before it can be baked.  But sourdough doesn’t always need forethought.  As long as you have some extra starter sitting around, there are always yummy possibilities in your future! 🙂

Today was one such morning at my house.  I’m pretty sure we’ve had the flu.  Using homeopathics, each of my kids burned through it in 3 days.  When I got sick, I just didn’t have the energy to treat myself.  Sleep!  Just give me sleep!  Oh, but by day 5 it was getting pretty old.  So last night I took time to give myself some TLC, and I worked up a remedy for myself.  This morning, when the kids woke me up asking what they should cook, I was very happy to announce that they could start school and I’d start breakfast!!

I learned my lesson.  Next time, I will take the time to remedy before I sleep!  Thankfully, we had some extra starter, so I made some quick Lemon Breakfast Cookies.  And to be more healthful, we served them with leftover veggies.

Lemon Breakfast Cookies, gluten-free, sourdough

You will need the zest and juice from one lemon.  Don’t forget to download the Lemon Breakfast Cookies PDF.

The Recipe 😉

  • 1/2 stick butter, very soft or partially melted
  • 1/2 cup tapioca starch
  • 1/2 cup brown rice starter
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup honey PLUS 1/8 tsp. Sweet Leaf, white stevia extract
  • zest and juice from one lemon
  • 1/2 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.

Begin by softening the butter.  Then dump all the rest in and stir well.  Allow to sit a few minutes and the dough will thicken.

Line your baking sheet with parchment paper.  Scoop, 1-1/2 tablespoons at a time, and form into balls.  I use a pampered chef scoop.

1.5 TBS Scoop

You should get 21 scoops=21 cookies.  There may be half a scoop left, if anyone wants a baby cookie. 🙂  Press with your fingers to flatten.

Shaping lemon breakfast cookies

Bake at 350 degrees for approximately 15 minutes.

I use an Air Bake pan for these.  If you are using a bar pan like Pampered Chef sells, you may want to preheat the pan, or it may need to bake just a few minutes longer.

You can decide how many “cookies” you feel makes a reasonable serving.  I serve 3 per person.

These breakfast cookies were inspired by Raising Generation Nourished.  My daughter began making her breakfast cookies when we went gluten-free, but being who I am, I HAD to do a sourdough version!  The sourdough is softer, contains less starch, and is easier on the digestion.

Delicious!

Recipe: Gluten-Free Sourdough Corn Bread

We have had sub-zero temps in Minnesota.  Every few days it warms up enough to snow.  Today our high is supposed to be 4 degrees, but with windshield if feels like -23.  No way around it.  It is just COLD!! 

Storms in recent years have insured we have a surplus of wood.  My husband drug some of those downed trees out of the woods and cut them into the right sized chunks.  The kids have become proficient at loading the logs into the splitter and then stacking it. . . and we have firewood.  😉 I’m thankful for the wood stove in the basement.  Without it, the upstairs thermostat would have the main floor toasty, but the basement would still be cold.

Truth?  I’m praying for a larger woodstove; one that is the proper size for our square footage.  It would supply the blessing of burning all night without anyone having to get up to feed it, and it would warm the whole house sufficiently to turn off the electric heat (a significant $$ saver).

When the temps are this cold, give me hot tea, soup, or chili.  And what goes better with that than corn bread?  I loved the corn bread recipe my mother made when I was growing up, and I’ve converted it into a gluten free sourdough version that my kids think is still So GOOD, and it’s Oh, so easy!

Delicious gluten-free, sourdough corn bread recipe!

I prefer using a 10 inch cast iron skillet for this recipe.  It bakes faster and everyone gets a kick out of the “pie” shaped pieces.  You can also bake it in an 8×8 or 7×11 inch pan and it still turns out perfect.  It just takes a few minutes longer.

To download a PDF of this recipe, Click Here:  Gluten-Free Sourdough Corn Bread.

Ready?

Stir together:

  • 1/4 cup of butter, melted, but not hot
  • 3/4 cup water
  • stir in 1/2 cup of brown rice sourdough starter (fed in the past 12 hours)
  • 1/2 cup brown rice flour
  • 1 cup corn flour (I use actual corn flour, not meal which is more course)

After combining well, cover and allow to ferment for 7-12 hours.

After fermenting:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees, and put your cast iron pan or baking pan in the oven to heat up.  To your dough, Add:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup coconut/date sugar, honey, or white sugar  *To reduce sugar, use 1/3 cup of one of the aforementioned sweeteners & 1/8th teaspoon of white, Sweet Leaf Stevia Powder.*
  • 1 tsp. baking soda (add last)

Remove pan from oven and add butter or oil, greasing all the sides and bottom of the pan.  Pour batter in pan and bake.

Cast Iron Skillet, bake 15 minutes and then check… mine is done!

Cake pan, bake 20-25 minutes.Glass baking dishes

I hope you enjoy this corn bread as much as our family does!  ~Linda

 

 

 

 

Recipe: Gluten-Free, Cranberry Almond Bread (Sourdough)

If there is one food that speaks of Christmas traditions to me, it would be Candy Cane Cookies.  And they’re not even peppermint, right?  It’s almond.  I love it.  I’ve been known to bake out those cookies all year long. . .  just roll them into a ball and flatten them.  No fancy shapes and no food coloring.  I just love the flavor.

So it’s no surprise that when my kids found a Cranberry Almond Loaf recipe in their Focus on the Family Club House Magazine several years ago, I fell in love with that too.  Same delicious, sweet almond flavor, only with cranberries for a bonus.

Cranberry Almond Loaf, original recipe

But then, that Gluten-Free thing happened; and I prefer to prepare foods as healthful as possible.  Therefore, with that criteria in mind, here is a new recipe for Cranberry, Almond Bread.  🙂  This is made with honey and stevia, rather than refined sugar.  The texture of the original bread was rather dry and crumbly, so this gluten-free loaf is more moist (on purpose), and just in time for the holidays!

Cranberry Almond Bread, Gluten-Free Sourdough

I’m not exactly a food photographer.  If you want jewelry photographed, that’s my thing! 

I set my table cloth and delicious loaf of “Christmas Bread” in front of the bay window to catch the early morning light, and the little ones gathered all around me!  The boys were bouncing up and down on both sides, hitting my elbows with their hard little heads while asking, “When can I have a piece?” over and over.  And the almost two year old was standing on a chair, hanging over the table, yelling, “I want some!  I want some!” rather persistently.  So short story?  The photo shoot didn’t last very long, and they made short work of the Cranberry Almond Bread!

Don’t forget to download the Gluten-Free Sourdough, Cranberry Almond Bread PDF   I hope you enjoy it as much as our family has.

Cranberry Almond Bread, Gluten-Free Sourdough at growinggraceful copy

Directions:

Combine wet ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup brown rice sourdough starter, fed in the past 12 hours
  • 1/2 cup water or milk

In a separate bowl, blend dry ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup sorghum (milo) flour
  • 1/2 cup teff flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca starch
  • 1.5 teaspoons fine psyllium husk powder (I use Viva brand)

Add to the wet ingredients, mix well, and cover to allow to ferment for 7-12 hours.

After fermenting:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Place your pan in the oven to heat.  To your batter, add:

  • 1/4 cup honey and 1/4 tsp. Sweet Leaf Stevia Powder
  • 2 tsp. almond extract
  • 2 eggs
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 teaspooon cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 cup dried cranberries

Mix well.  Remove pan from oven and melt butter along sides and bottom.  Pour batter and smooth top.  {If your kids distract you and your loaf sits awhile before going into the oven, the cranberries may sink to the bottom like mine. 😉 } However, bake it immediately and your cranberries will be well distributed throughout the loaf!

Loaf pan: Bake 45-50 minutes  (I use glass.)

In a hurry and want to bake this out more like a cake?  Use a 8×8″ or 11×7″ glass pan, and bake for 25-30 minutes.

Glass baking dishes

Azure Standard has a dried cranberry that is sweetened with apple juice, and I’ve been itching to get my hands on it.  So far, it has been out of stock, but they’re expecting a shipment this month, so I’ll get to try them in January!

If you’re like me and you are doing a low carb thing while your family continues to eat a more traditional fare, All Day I Dream About Food has a yummy Cranberry Cobbler recipe.  Just omit the cinnamon and vanilla, add a teaspoon of almond extract instead, and you can enjoy some low carb Cranberry Almond “Bread” right alongside everyone else.  😉

 

Recipe: Gluten-Free Sourdough Biscuits

I was resistant to going gluten-free for a long time.  I had spent so long cultivating good sourdough recipes using spelt (which is glutenous 😦 )that I couldn’t bear the thought of having to learn something new All.Over.Again.

As it turned out, my oldest daughter loves baking and so she scoured Pinterest for recipes and got busy in the kitchen.  I hardly had to do a thing to find new favorites, but the thing we all really missed was a good biscuit!

Oh, we tried several recipes, but nothing really measured up.  They tended to be dry, gummy or gritty.  I just didn’t enjoy them.  And then I got a gluten free starter going and discovered psyllium husk, and voila! We have biscuits!   🙂

The sourdough fermentation makes them soft and easy on the digestion.  The psyllium husk holds moisture, acts as a binder, and keeps the texture real, not gummy.  They are soooo GOOD! THis has become a tried-and-true recipe at our house.  Everyone gets excited when Mom makes biscuits!

Biscuits, mmmmm

Mmmmmmm…..

Are you ready to try them?

To print a PDF of the recipe, click:Gluten-Free Sourdough Biscuits.

Use starter that has been fed in the past 12 hours.

In a medium sized bowl, combine:

  • 1/2 cup buckwheat flour
  • 1/2 cup tapioca starch
  • 1 cup sorghum flour
  • 1/4 cup rice flour
  • 1-1/4 teaspoons fine psyllium husk powder (6.25 grams)

GF-Biscuit Flour

When these flours are well combined, cut in:

  • 1/2 cup butter

Then add:

  • 1/2 cup brown rice sourdough starter
  • 3/4 cup un-chlorinated water or milk of your preference (Take note that milk reduces the fermentation. )

GF biscuits before fermenting

When well combined, cover and allow to ferment 7-12 hours.

After fermenting:

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Sprinkle 1 teaspoon of baking soda and 1/2 tsp. salt over the dough and then mix thoroughly.  It will take on an airy feeling as the baking soda reacts with the acidity, neutralizing the sour flavor and adding a small rise to the dough.

GF-biscuits after souring

Roll out to the thickness you desire.  It will not noticeably rise in the oven, so decide now how thick you want them.  I have not noticed it affecting the bake time.  My kids like them about a half inch, smaller, so they can have “more” and feel like their servings are generous.  I have also rolled them out to approximately 1 inch.  I get between 8 and 12 biscuits depending on whether I make them smaller or taller.

GF- biscuits, cutting

Use a spatula or other flat utensil to lift off up and place on a baking sheet.  You can use parchment paper if you’d like, but it’s not necessary.

Bake for 8-10 minutes on a traditional baking sheet or 10-12 minutes on a stone pan.

Allow to rest for a few minutes and then slice, butter, and enjoy!

 

 

Recipe: Gluten-Free Sourdough Bread

If you have a bubbly, thriving brown rice sourdough starter, then you are ready to start baking!

I recently took this bread to a church fellowship meal and an out of town guest who has suffered from Celiac Disease for 20 years said that after trying many gluten free bread recipes, her long search was over!  This gluten-free sourdough bread is it!  She wasn’t the only one who thought so because there wasn’t any left!

It is a beautiful, good tasting bread that slices well.  To print, download the recipe PDF: Gluten-Free Sourdough Bread.

Ingredients:

1 cup brown rice starter

3 eggs

4 TBS melted butter, not too hot

1-1/4 cups or your choice of milk

2 TBS honey

1 cup sorghum flour

1/4 cup brown rice flour

1/2 cup buckwheat flour

3/4 cup tapioca starch

4 tsp. psyllium husks, finely ground–not all brands are the same; I use THIS BRAND  (alternative: 1 TBS xanthum gum)

2 tsp. salt

1/2 TBS  (1- 1/2 tsp. baking soda)

Directions:

  • In a large bowl, melt butter and stir in water.  Add starter, eggs, and honey.
  • In a separate bowl, mix dry ingredients (NOT baking soda!! Reserve soda for just before baking.) Use a whisk or beaters to thoroughly blend in the psyllium husks.
  • Mix wet and dry ingredients, beating with a mixer until very well combined.
  • Cover with a lid, or plate, or plastic wrap and allow to ferment a minimum of 7 hours (12 hours is ideal).  If you need to bake bread in less time, place in the oven (turned off) and turn on the oven light to warm things up and speed the fermentation process.

{The bread batter before fermenting}

After Fermenting:

  • After fermenting, when ready to bake, preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

{The bread batter “sponge” after fermenting}

  • Place bread pan in oven with oil or butter in it and allow it to melt.  While it is melting, add baking soda to bread batter and mix thoroughly.

IMG_20170803_091315499

{This is how it looks after mixing in the soda.}

  • Remove hot bread pan from oven and distribute oil around the pan, greasing all the sides.
  • Scrape bread batter into bread pan and smooth the top.

sandwich bread in pan

  • Reduce heat to 350 degrees F and bake bread for 50-55 minutes.
  • After removing bread from the oven, allow to sit a few minutes.  Run a knife around the outside to release from the pan if necessary, and then transfer to a cooling rack.
  • Allow to cool and then slice.

sandwich bread 2

sandwich bread

Makes 1 loaf.  Enjoy!

This bread was inspired by a sandwich bread at Cultures for Health.  The original recipe uses xanthum gum, contains more starch, and a few other differences.

 

Caring For Your Gluten-Free Sourdough Starter

 

 

gluten-free starter care

If you have never baked with sourdough, there are a few good things to know.

What Is Sourdough?

Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water that contains wild yeasts and lactobacilli. These naturally occurring cultures actually “eat” the simple sugars in the grains, beginning the process of breaking it down.  During this process, they produce carbon dioxide, which appears as bubbles, that helps rise your dough.  These cultures also produce lactic acid which prevents the growth of harmful bacteria.

Sourdough is an efficient way to bake for your family.  As long as you save some some “starter” each time you use it, and continue to “feed” it, giving it more flour and water, it will continue to multiply and serve you indefinitely. Because using sourdough incorporates the use of these wild yeasts as leavening in your baked products, this means you do not need to buy instant dry yeast from the store… so you may expect to save time and money.

Since the wild yeasts feed on the sugars in the grains, properly prepared sourdough products are lower on the glycemic index than non-sourdough goods.   Now, let me be clear here… I said it is low-er on the glycemic index… I didn’t say it’s safe to pig out  😉 Grains are still starches that provide quick energy to the body.  Moderation, as always, please.

Also, because the sourdough yeasts begin the process of breaking down the flours you bake with, the finished product is easier on the digestive system.  The wild yeasts and bacteria neutralize anti-nutrients and enzyme inhibitors that are naturally occurring in grains, and actually produce some vitamins themselves, which means more nutrition is readily available.

Other Advantages

Gluten free grains are often more dry and gritty than their glutenous counterparts, and recipes can require more starch.  As the yeasts begin to break down the grains, they are softened, giving baked goods a more pleasant texture, and our family thinks they have a richer flavor.

How to Care for Your Starter

  • Wild yeasts do not like metal.  Whether you are cultivating sourdough, kefir or kombucha, please do not store your cultures in metal–it will kill them.  You can use metal fork/spoon for mixing your baked goods; just don’t store it in metal. Keep your sourdough starter, and unbaked products, in glass.  Except for dipping, as shown in the featured photo, avoid storing in plastics as you do not want your culture to leach chemicals for your family to later consume.
  • Only use un-chlorinated water because the chemicals will kill your starter. If you live in the city and do not have filtered water, measure your water, leave it set for 12 hours before using, and the chlorine should evaporate out.
  • If you are perpetuating more than one type of culture in your kitchen: ie, kombucha…  it is a good idea to keep a few feet between them.
  • Cover, but do not seal air tight.  Fruit flies and other insects just love fermented goodness.  If your sourdough is not covered, it will turn into an insect trap.  (yuck!)
  • Sourdough is more active in warmer temperatures, and slows down in colder temps.  If you keep your starter out on the counter in a moderate temps, it will probably need fed every 12 hours.  If you use it daily, then this is perfect.  If, however, you do not want to use it daily, store your freshly fed starter in the refrigerator and it will not have to be fed for at least a week.
  • After sitting, if there is a layer of liquid on top (may be clearish, pinkish or brownish), this is called hooch.  Just pour it off, down the sink, and freshen your starter: assuming your gluten free starter is brown rice, so feed it some brown rice flour and water.  Stir well, cover, and give a few hours for your starter to get all bubbly and active before using in a recipe.  If you are used to glutenous sourdough which can get frothy on top, it’s helpful to know that the rice starter does not get bubbly on top, but you can see the gas pockets all through the “sponge” through the side of your glass storage container.  (In the past, I did maintain a buckwheat starter, which I began following the same directions as the boosted rice starter.  It was easy to maintain.  I eventually threw it out because buckwheat is stronger smelling and the rice worked equally well.)
  • It is important to know guidelines for how much to feed starter.  Do not exceed 4:1. Four parts new flour and water to one part active starter.  You may feed your starter less, but do not feed it more than this at once because you do not want to weaken it. If your starter will be sitting on the counter all day, do not feed it less than a 1:1 ratio; One part starter to one part fresh brown rice flour and water.  So, for example, if I have had 1/2 cup of starter in the fridge all week and I take it out to use it, I am going to feed it 1/2 cup of fresh brown rice flour and stir in enough water to make it the consistency I want it.  If you make it too thin, the extra water will rise to the top.
  • If your starter sits too long and the top gets dry and pinkish, use a spoon to ladle off the top and discard.  Transfer to a clean glass container and then feed.
  • What about discarding down the sink?  The yeast is amazing for your pipes and septic.  A friend of ours is a septic designer and he highly recommends it!  😉
  • Recipes are mixed up ahead of time, and ferment to allow the wild yeasts to do their magic.  They should not ferment for less than 7 hours before baking.  If you are in a time pinch, remember that sourdough is more active in warmer temperatures.  You can place dough next to a slow cooker or place in an oven that is OFF: if you have a gas oven that is kept warm by a pilot light, or if you have an electric oven you can turn the light on to keep warm.  If you feel the oven is too warm, just prop door open a smidge by placing an oven mitt in the way so it doesn’t close completely.  Remove to complete and bake when ready.  If you have a cool kitchen in the winter, then again, you will want to let your goods sour longer, or find a warm spot for them.  If you have a HOT kitchen, your products will be ready to bake sooner rather than later.

If you have questions or need clarification, please ask about it in the comments.  If you are wondering, someone else is bound to question the same thing!

Well, now you are ready to begin baking with your starter, and I am ready to begin sharing recipes!

Care instructions are available as a PDF for download here: How to care for your gluten free starter

 

Making a Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

It was 7 years ago that I decided to delve into the world of sourdough!  I was pregnant with Precious #6, and I took a sourdough e-course from GNOWFGLINS Traditional Cooking School.  The class was awesome!  The series began with teaching how to make a starter from scratch and then how to use that starter to make everything from breads to cakes.  The course included a pdf for those who learn best from reading, and it featured videos for visual junkies like me–I learn best from watching and doing.  I was able to cultivate a starter from spelt flour (a glutenous ancient grain), tried the recipes in the e-course, and soon converted my own recipes to this more healthful method of preparing breads.

At the time, we ate a lot of gluten free foods as well.  I had been wheat free for many years, but everything I read about gluten free sourdough, which used a brown rice starter, said it could be difficult to maintain and that it may require re-starting a starter now and then.  I am all for easy, so  No, thank you!  And so I was too intimidated to try.

When I HAD to go gluten free, I missed my sourdough!  Gluten free grains can be more gritty, and I knew my baked goods would not be as nutritious or digestible without the benefits of fermentation.  Eventually I decided to just try it, and I’m so glad I did!  No more guilt for whipping up quick breads, lol!  This gluten free sourdough thing is good, and as it turns out, it’s easy too!  My starter has been going strong for about two years and I have never had an issue.

After sharing a picture of some fresh bread on Facebook, I received a lot of requests for a recipe.  I plan to teach a local class in September, and will give starter to participants, but for anyone who is in a hurry or not local, I decided to share the steps to going gluten free sourdough with you.  The first thing you need is a starter!

19780555_10214000995726940_4343374845749413109_o

You will need:

Filtered water,

Clean glass mason jar  (for starting your starter!),

a paper towel or clean piece of fabric with a rubber band or jar ring to cover the jar,

brown rice flour,

and coconut water kefir.  If you do not have coconut water kefir, you can learn what that is and how to make it HERE.

Since I didn’t invent this Boosted Brown Rice Sourdough Starter, I’m going to send you to the web site that taught me.  You can find instructions over HERE at The Art of Gluten Free Sourdough Baking.

One thing I will add to her directions is:  Follow her directions exactly on the first day. However,  on the second day–on the second feeding and following when you feed your newly fermenting starter, before you add the 1/3 to 1/2 cup of brown rice and water, first remove and discard 1/3 to 1/2 cup of starter.  If you do not remove starter before feeding, you are going to be swimming in starter, and larger quantities of starter require being fed larger amounts.  So simplify and remove some starter before feeding.  You will know if your starter is healthy if it develops lots of airy bubbles throughout the jar.  You will be able to see these developing as it ages… less after being fed and more before the next feeding.

Here is a look at my thriving starter:

GF sourdough starter 1

And here is a top view.  The top looks a little dry.  It has been sitting, covered on my counter all day.  I’m ready to use some in a recipe for breakfast and then I will feed it.

GF sourdough starter 2

If creating your own gluten free sourdough starter is not something you feel like tackling right now, but you want to get started baking, you can buy a starter from Cultures for Health.  It will come with instructions that are easy to follow.

Starters are fermented, so definitely expect a sour smell.  It is unpleasant to some people, but I promise your finished baked goods will smell heavenly and taste yummy… rarely ever a sour flavor when you actually eat it!

If you have questions, please let me know in the comments below… someone else is bound to be wondering the same thing!

Good luck, have fun, and when you have a thriving starter you can come back here to try out some recipes with me!